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March, 01 1998 |  Share

Behind the Labels: Made in China (Appendix)

 

APPENDIX 

UNICEF/ 93-1765/ Roger Lemoyne

APPENDIX 1

Who Control the $180 Billion a Year

U.S. apparel Market?

* 19 GIANT COMPANIES DO *
CONTROLLING 80% OF RENTAIL SLAES
COMPANY
SALES
EST. SALES APPAREL
MARKET SHARE (%) (n11)
OPERATING PR.

Wal-Mart Stores

104.9 

26.2  (n1) 

14.6 

4,408. 

Dayton-Hudson

25.4  

19.0  (n2) 

10.6 

1,359. 

Sears

38.2  

15.4  (n4) 

8.5 

3,475.  

 J.C. Penney 

23.6 

14.6  (n3) 

8.1  

1,622.  

Federated

15.7  

11.7  (n2) 

6.5  

1,202. 

May Co. 

12.0 

8.7  (n5)

4.9  

1,509. 

The Limited 

8.6 

8.6 

4.8

648. 

K Mart 

31.4 

7.3  (n6) 

4.1 

773. 

Levi Strauss 

61.0  

6.1  (n8) 

3.4  

na 

 VF Corp. 

51.4 

5.1  

2.9  

557. 

Sara Lee Corp.

197.3  

4.4  (n7)  

2.4  

1,643. 

Fruit of the Loom

24.5  

 2.4

1.4  

325.  

Liz Claiborne 

22.2 

2.2  

1.2 

235. 

The Gap

52.8

5.3  

2.9  

729.  

Kellwood

15.2  

1.5 

.9 

85. 

Woolworth

80.9 

1.5  (n9) 

.8 

318.   

Russell

12.4 

1.2 

.7 

154. 

Warnaco

10.6 

1.1 

.6  

165. 

Phillips Van Heusen

13.6  

1.0  (n10)  

.6 

48. 

         

IN MILLIONS 

801.7 

143.5 

79.7 

19,255  

n1 

25 percent of total sales are softgoods/domestics. 

n2 

Field specialist suggest that 75 percent of total sales are apparel sales. 

n3 

75 percent of store and catalog sales, excludes drug stores, insurance and "other" sales. 

n4 

Domestic department store sales were 30,742 million, an estimated 50 percent were apparel. 

n5 

Apparel sales are an estimated 75 percent of total sales. 

n6 

Footwear sales were subtracted from total retail sales. Wal-Mart estimated that apparel sales were of 25 percent of total sales. 

n7 

Includes only personal products division apportioned by Total U.S./Total Sales. 

n8 

1996 figures from Ward's Business Directory of U.S. Private and Public Companies, Detroit. 

n9 

Includes only General Merchandise for the U.S. and Northern Group sales. 

n10 

Excludes footwear. 

n11 

The American Apparel Manufacturers Association says American consumers spent $180 billion on apparel purchases in 1996. 

 

All data is most recent available: fiscal year 1996. Where fiscal year ends prior to July, year end is 1997.

Operating profit is profit from the company's major line of business. It includes income and expenses related to product production and sales. Pre-tax profit also includes income and expenses from other aspects of the company's operation, such as financial gains and losses, special items, or interest expense.

 


 

APPENDIX 2

Company Profiles/Working Conditions

FACTORIES IN CHINA PRODUCING GOODS FOR EXPORT TO THE U.S.
 COMPANY/LABEL
FACTORY IN CHINA
WAGES PER HOUR
HOUR PER WEEK
CONDITIONS

Wal-Mart/Kathie Lee handbags 

Liang Shi Handbag Factory  

$.13 to $.23 an hour   

60-70 hours per week/10 hour shifts/
6-7 days a week  

-- No factory fire exits
-- Dirty, cramped dorms, 10 to a room
-- For 70 hour week, warehouse workers earn $3.44
-- No benefits
-- No legal work contract
-- Never heard of Code of Conduct

Wal-Mart/Kathie Lee handbags 

Ya Li Handbag, Limited  

$.18 to $.28 an hour   

60-hour normal work week, plus overtime up to 16-hour shifts  

-- Forced overtime-stiff fines for refusal
-- Overtime premium of 2 1/2 cents an hour
-- Some workers not paid 3-4 months
-- 12 to a dorm room
-- No benefits, no work contract
-- Never heard of Code of Conduct

Wal-Mart/Kathie Lee 

Li Wen Factory

$.20 to $.35 an hour 

84-hour work week/12-hour shifts/ 7 days a week mandatory 24-hour shifts during rush times 

-- Forced overtime, severe fines for refusal
-- No benefits, no overtime rate
-- No fire exits in dormitories
-- No work contract
-- Never heard of Code of Conduct 


Wal-Mart  

Tianjin Yuhua Garment Factory  

$.23 an hour  

60-hour work week 

Wal-Mart is pulling out
of this factory and other large publicly-owned plants in the north to relocate its work to unregulated lower- wage privately-owned
sweatshops in the south of China 

Ann Taylor and Preview   Kang Yi Fashion Manufacturers  

$.14 an hour 

96 hour work week/7 days a week/7 a.m. to midnight  

-- Never heard of Code of Conduct
-- 6 to 10 in dorm rooms

Ralph Lauren, Ellen Tracy/ Linda Allard 

Iris Fashions 

 

$.23 an hour  

 
72-to-80-hour week/12 to 15-hour shifts/6 days a week   

-- No union
-- Paid a $.06 an hour premium for overtime
-- Paid $.02 for each shirt collar sewn  

Esprit Label (Esprit Group)

You Li Fashion Factory 

$.13 an hour   

93 hour work week/7:30 7:30 a.m. to midnight/
7 days a week  

-- No overtime pay
-- No benefits
-- Sometimes need to work 24 hour shifts
-- 6 to 8 to dorm room
-- Dorm is dark and dirty
-- Workers afraid
-- Under constant surveillance
-- Never heard of Corporate Code of Conduct  

Liz Claiborne and Bugle Boy  

Shanghai Shirt 2d Factory  

$.25 an hour 

66 hour work week/8 a.m. to 8 p.m./6 days a week  

-- Fined if don't work overtime
-- No union  

Liz Claiborne 

Shanghai Jiang District Silk Fashions Ltd.  

$.28 an hour   

60 to 70 hours a week/11 1/2 hour shift/6 days a week 

 

J.C. Penney

Zhong Mei Garment Factory  

$.18 an hour 

78 hours a week/11 hour shifts/7 days a week  

-- No union
-- No benefits
-- Workers never heard of J.C. Penney Corporate Code of Conduct  

Casual Corner

Chunmei Garments Factory

$.18 an hour

64-hour work week/
10 1/2 hour shifts/
6 days a weeks

-- Workers never heard of Corporate Code of Conduct
-- When there is no work, the workers are not paid 

Kmart

Shanghai No.4 Shirt Factory

$.28 an hour  

70 hours a week

 

T.J. Maxx 

Jun Mei Fashion Co.

$.16 an hour

70 hour work week

-- No union
-- 8 to dorm room 

(Embroidery Work for various U.S. companies)

Mei Yi Embroidery Factory

$.28 an hour

70 hours a week/
12 hour shifts/
6 days a week

-- No benefits 

(Embroidery Work for various U.S. companies)

Tianjin Mei Hua Computer Embroidery Garment Company

$.28 an hour

78 hours a week/
11 hour shifts/
7 days a week

-- No union 

Cherokee Jeans

Meiming Garment Factory

$.24 an hour

60-70-hour work week

-- No benefits
-- Workers never heard of monitoring
-- 8 to a dorm room 

Milano Label (?)

Xin Fu Group Garment Manufacturing Corp

$.34 an hour

82-hour work week/
12 hour shifts/
7 days a week

-- 4 workers share dorm room
-- No union 

Sears

Tianjin Beifang Garment Factory

$.28 an hour  

60 hours a week

Sears is pulling out to relocate its work to lower wage unregulated sweatshops in the south. 

Structure/ The Limited

Aoda Garment Factory

$.32 an hour

70 hours a week

-- No union
-- 6 workers to dorm room 

(Various U.S. Labels)

Hua Yong Garment Factory

$.18 an hour

78-to-96-hour work week/ 12-to-14-hour shifts/ 7 days a week

-- No benefits
-- Fined if you do not work overtime
-- No union
-- Never heard of Corporate Code of Conduct  

(Various U.S. Labels)

Shenzhen Yang Fu Garment Factory

$.49 an hour

68 hours a work

-- Workers never heard of any U.S. Corporate Codes of Conduct 

Ava-Line lapel pins. Sold 150,000 lapel pins to the Republican National Convention in 1996.

In China

$.09 an hour

98 hours a week/
7 a.m. to 11 p.m. /
7 days a week

-- 16 in dorm room
-- "young girls that come from the hills"
-- "we own them" 

Nike Athletic Shoes

Wellco Factory

$.16 an hour

77 to 84 hours a week/11-to-12-hour shifts/7 days a week

-- Fined if refuse to work overtime
-- Overtime rate not paid
-- Most had no legal work contract
-- Humiliation, screaming, some corporal punishment
-- Arbitrary fining of pregnant and older (25 years old and up) women
-- Fines if talking at work
-- Approximately 10 children in the sewing section
-- Most workers never heard of Nike's Code of Conduct 

Nike and Adidas Athletic Shoes

Yue Yuen Factory

$.19 an hour

60 to 84 hours a week

-- Forced overtime, no overtime premium paid
-- Excessive noise pollution, fumes in the factory
-- No worker had heard of Nike or Adidas Corporate Code of Conduct 

Adidas Garments

Tung Tat Garment Factory

$.22 an hour

75 to 87 1/2 hours per week/ 12 1/2 hour shifts
6 or 7 days a week

-- Fined if late/resting./found talking
-- Forced morning calisthenics
-- 8 to dorm room 

(Various U.S. Labels)

Fashion Garment Factory

$.26 an hour

80 1/2 to 84 hours a week/11 1/2 to 12 hours Shifts/7 days a week

-- Not given work contracts
-- Dorm canteen was filthy
-- Fined if miss 3 days work 

(Various U.S. toys)

Sewco Factory

$.19 an hour

92 hours a week/13 hour shifts/7 days a week

-- Sometimes work up to 20 hours straight
-- No overtime rates paid
-- Exposed to dangerous chemicals 

 

   


 

APPENDIX 3

Resource Groups/ Key Non- governmental Human and Workers Rights Organizations in Hong Kong

Asia Monitor Resource Center
444 Nathan Road, 8-B
Kowloon, Hong Kong
Phone:011 852-2332/1346
Fax: 011 852-2385/5319
Email:AMRC@hk.super.net

Hong Kong Christian Industrial Committee
3/F, 57 Peking Road, T.S.T. Hong Kong
Phone: 011 852-2366/5860
Fax: 011 852-2724/5098
Email: hkcic@hknet.com

China Labor Bulletin
PO Box 72465, Central Post Office
Kowloon, Hong Kong
Phone: 011 852-2780/2187
Fax: 011 852-2359/4324
Email: clb@hkstar.com

(These important NGO organizations need our full support for their groundbreaking work to empower workers and help create the space for their independent organizing. For now, they are surviving under the "one country, two systems" doctrine adopted when Britain ceded Hong Kong to China in July 1997. In mainland China, the government has silenced nearly all dissent, and broken all attempts to form independent human rights, labor or religious groups.)

 


 

APPENDIX 4

Company Contact Information

Adidas
9605 S.W. Nimbus Avenue
Beaverton, OR 97008
Tel (800) 289-2724
Fax (503) 972-2450

Esprit Group
c/o Esprit de Corp
900 Minnesota Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
Tel (415) 648-6900
Fax (415) 550-3884

May Company
611 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63101
Tel (314) 342-6300
Fax (314) 621-4684 

Ann Taylor
142 West 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel (212) 541-3300
Fax (212) 541-3379 

Federated Department Stores
1440 Broadway
New York, NY 10018
Tel (212) 840-1440
Fax (212) 740-1752 

Nike
One Bowerman Drive
Beaverton, OR 97005
Tel (503) 671-6433
Fax (503) 671-6300 

Bugle Boy
2900 Madera Road
Simi Valley, CA 93065
Tel (805) 582-1010
Fax (805) 522-1212 

J.C. Penney
6501 Legacy Drive
Plano, TX 75024
Tel (972) 431-1000
Fax (972) 431-1977 

Ralph Lauren
650 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022
Tel (212) 318-7351
Fax (212) 318-7183 

Cal Safety Compliance Corp.
3700 S Santa Fe Avenue, #100
Los Angeles, CA 90058
Tel (213) 277-9665
Fax (213) 277-9612 

Kmart Corporation
3100 West Big Beaver
Troy, MI 48084
Tel (248) 643-1000
Fax (248) 614-0664 

Reebok International
100 Technology Center Drive
Stouthton, MA 02072
Tel (781) 401-7303
Fax (781) 341-1532 

Dayton Hudson Corp.
777 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402-2055
Tel (612) 370-6948
Fax (612) 304-5226 

The Limited (including Structure stores)
Two Limited Parkway
P.O. Box 16000
Columbus, Ohio 43216
Tel (614) 479-7000
Fax (614) 415-7208 

Sears, Roebuck &Co.
333 Beverly Road
Hoffman Estates, IL 60179
Tel (847) 286-2500
Fax (800) 427-3049

Disney
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Tel (818) 623-3200
Fax (818) 623-3569

Liz Claiborne
1441 Broadway 8th fl
New York, NY 10018
Tel (212) 354-4900
Fax (212) 626-3416

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
702 S.W. 8th Street
Beutonville, Arkansas 72716
Tel (800) WAL-MART
Fax (501) 273-4894

Ellen Tracy
575 7th Ave
New York, NY 10019
Tel (212) 944-6999
Fax (212) 398-1678

 

 

 


 

APPENDIX 5

Shoping with the NLC:

A Sample of Clothing Made in China
MARCH 1998
 LABEL
ITEM
STORE
PRICE

Ann Taylor

women's suit jacket, silk 

Ann Taylor Fifth Avenue New York City  

$198.00

Ellen Tracy

women's sleeveless blouse, silk 

Lord & Taylor
5th Avenue, New York City   

$155.00 

Structure

100% linen men's shirt

Structure Store
Smithhaven Mall
Smithtown, Long Island 

$64.50  

Liz Claiborne Collection 

olive green 100% silk jacket

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall
Smithtown, Long Island  

$200.00  

Liz Claiborne

"Brazilian Rain" style silk blouse 

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall, Long Island  

$94.00 

Liz Claiborne

"Sophisticated Suitings" style 100% silk blouse

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall
Smithtown, Long Island 

$72.00 

 Liz Sport 

100% rayon blouse "bright & easy"

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall,
Smithtown, Long Island 

$59.00 

Ralph Lauren

linen women's shorts blue with flowers  

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall, Long Island

$68 

Ralph Lauren

women's long-sleeved blouse silk  

Macy's
Smithhaven Mall,
Long Island

$98 

Kathie Lee

Pocketbooks-- various styles  

Wal-Mart, Long Island NY  

$12.96 each 

Kathie Lee

Billfold/wallet

Wal-Mart, Long Island NY  

$7.69 

Kathie Lee

Cigarette case

Wal-Mart, Long Island NY

$4.96 

Kathie Lee

Haircomb w/bow 

Wal-Mart, Long Island NY 

$4.96  

Disney

Easter basket: basket & toy made in China 

Wal-Mart, Long Island NY  

$9.97 

St. John's Bay

men's jacket, cotton w/suede collar 

J.C. Penney 

$80.00  

Worthington

women's short sleeved
 sweater w/embroidered and
beaded collar ramie/cotton blend  
  

J.C. Penney 

$36.00  

Caribou

women's blouse, short
sleeves, 100% rayon 

J.C. Penney   

$19.99 

Towncraft

men's golf shirt  

J.C. Penney  

$15.99  

Executive Collection

women's skirt suit, 100%
 polyester, beaded 

Sears  

$119.00 

Kathie Lee Collection

embroidered sweater
ramie/cotton, white with
blue  

Wal-Mart   

$24.96 

Faded Glory

heavy corduroy shirt with
zipper 100% cotton, purple

Wal-Mart  

$16.92 

Nautica 

men's golf shirt  

T.J. Maxx   

$24.00 

$58.00 sugg. retail 
  

Baxter Chino Jeanswear Co. 

Wide-wale corduroy pants 

T.J. Maxx  

$19.99 

Prism

short sleeved mens shirt, 100% rayon  

T.J. Maxx  

$9.99 

Karl Kani Outerwear

dark blue outerwear shirt with zipper breast pockets   

T.J. Maxx   

$24.99 

 


 

APPENDIX 6

June 6, 1996
Kathie Lee Gifford Agrees to
Independent Monitoring and a Living Wage

 

Statement Following a Meeting
at the Residence of Archbishop Cardinal O'Connor

At a ninety minute meeting held at the Manhattan Residence of Archbishop Cardinal O'Connor, Kathie Lee Gifford spoke with 15 year old Honduran maquila worker Wendy Diaz and with leaders of religious, human rights and labor organizations directly involved in ending sweatshop abuses.

In addition to Kathie Lee Gifford and Wendy Diaz, participants in the meeting included Charles Kernaghan of the National Labor Committee, Esperanza Reyes of the Committee for the Defense of Human Rights in Honduras, the Rev. David Dyson of the People of Faith Coalition and Jay Mazur of UNITE. Participants described it as "frank and constructive."

Following their meeting the group agreed to the following communique:
 

  • The group agreed that the challenge of eliminating the sweatshops can only be met when corporations, governments, unions and concerned citizens assume their appropriate responsibilities. By acknowledging the reality of labor abuse in the apparel industry and speaking out against it, Kathie Lee Gifford has admirably met her responsibilities.
  • Workers, like those in the Global Fashions factory In Honduras, who insist on expressing their legal and moral rights , should not be punished by losing their jobs when abuses are discovered. Accordingly, Kathie Lee Gifford believes an independent monitoring program that provides an initial warning to manufacturers should be implemented so that abuses can be ended and jobs can be protected.
  • Kathie Lee Gifford agreed that she would encourage Wal-Mart to return garment manufacturing to the Global Fashions factory providing that conditions at the plant consistently met standards that protect labor and human rights and that conditions are monitored by independent organizations such as The Committee for the Defense of Human Rights in Honduras.
  • To assure compliance with respect to human rights, the participants agreed that the nation's retailers and apparel manufacturers should create an alliance that supports the establishment of a program or independent third party monitoring of plant conditions. This would include those factories world wide where Kathie Lee Gifford apparel is manufactured.
  • Because of her courageous and outspoken behavior the well being of Wendy Diaz is of concern to Kathie Lee Gifford and the labor and human rights organizations who met with her today and must be of direct concern to the Honduran government and the Honduran Maquiladora Association.
  • All corporations doing business in the Maquila industry in Honduras, and throughout the world, should adapt a business code of ethics that ensures all local laws relating to the protection of minors and working conditions are rigorously enforced and that employees are provided with a living wage that ensures work with dignity.

Following the meeting Kathie Lee Gifford stated, "Wendy Diaz has a message that compels every American consumer, every American manufacturer and every American citizen to ask, 'Under what conditions are the products we buy being manufactured?' Her courage is to be admired while her personal call to action is nothing less than critical for the entire garment industry. Miss Diaz needs to be heard by everyone with a conscience."

Ms. Diaz told Kathie Lee Gifford, "I hope you can help us put an end to all this hardship. In that way we can have better treatment, better wages and I would like you to permit independent monitoring of the factory."

Ms. Gifford responded, in part, "I believe all children are God's children. I had no idea what was happening but now that I know I will do everything I can to help you."

UNITE's Jay Mazur stated, "The struggle against sweatshops at home and abroad has won a powerful ally in Kathie Lee Gifford. Let us hope that Wal-Mart and other large retailers will now assume their corporate responsibility to help clean up this industry."

Charles Kernaghan of the National Labor Committee, who brought the plight of Wendy Diaz to members of Congress, commented, "Kathie Lee Gifford deserves tremendous credit and support for the major step she has taken to defend worker and human rights by calling upon Wal-Mart to return to the Global Fashion plant in Honduras and establish independent monitoring. The minute Global abides by the standards of decency in the workplace Wal-Mart's return will be a watershed moment setting new human rights standards for the entire industry."

Kernaghan also offered his apology to Kathie Lee Gifford, "In our efforts to defend the rights of children and women working in the assembly plants in Central America, we never intended to hurt anyone personally and are truly sorry for any pain caused to Kathie Lee Gifford and her family by this work."

The Rev. David W. Dyson, Pastor of Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church and a human rights monitor, stated, "The People of Faith Network is relieved that the parties have finally met and dialogued and are now fighting child labor instead of fighting each other. Wal-Mart, and other companies now, have the ability to demonstrate their leadership in working with local monitoring organizations to ensure that these abuses come to an end once and for all."

Dale Ingram, corporate public relations director for Wal-Mart stated, "We have high praise for Miss Gifford and all the parties involved in continuing the dialogue and the resolve to find a common sense long term solution. Once the Global Fashion plant is certified under our strict standards we will agree to put them back on the approved vendor list and given them every opportunity along with our approved factories throughout the world."

 


 

APPENDIX 7

Imprisoned Labour Activists and Unionists

The following is a tiny minority of the labour activists imprisoned in China (Source:
China Labour Bulletin last update: March 1, 1998).

(1989) indicates arrested in connection with the 1989 Pro-Democracy Movement.

 

  
SHANGHAI

Wang Miaogen
Date of Birth: 1954
Occupation: Manual worker
Residence: Shanghai
Name of organization: Shanghai Workers Autonomous Federation
Apprehended: June 9, 1989, Shanghai
Assigned: Two and a half years re-education through labour
Released: January 1, 1991
Apprehended: April 1, 1993, Shanghai
Last detention place known: Shanghai An Kang PSB Hospital
Notes: Wang was arrested in 1993 to prevent him from conduction a public protest during the East Asian Games. He was reportedly beaten up by the police and forcibly committed to a psychiatric hospital.

  
BEIJING

Liu Jingsheng
Date of birth: 1955
Occupation: Manual worker
Residence: Tong County, Hebei
Place of work: Tongyi Chemical Plant
Name of organization: Free Labour Union, China s Social Democratic Party, China s Progressive Alliance, China s Liberal and Democratic Party
Detained: For some months, in 79
Apprehended: May 28, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro- democracy activities
Arrested: September 27, 1992
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for organizing a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 15 years imprisonment, 4 years deprivation of political rights
Notes: In the 70 s, took part in Democracy Wall Movement

Hu Shigen also known as Hu Shenglun
Date of birth:
1956
Occupation: Academic
Residence: Nanchang, Guangxi
Place of work: Beijing Foreign Languages Institute
Name of organization: LPDC (Liberal Democratic Party of China)
Apprehended: May 27, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democratic activities
Arrested: September 27,1992
Indicted: July 29,1993, for organizing and leading a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4,1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 20 years imprisonment

Kang Yuchun
Date of birth: 1965
Occupation: Doctor
Residence: Beijing
Place of work: Department of Psychiatry of Anding Hospital
Name of organization: China Progressive Alliance
Apprehended: May 27, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democracy activities
Arrested: September 27, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for organizing and leading a counter group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 17 years imprisonment and 4 years deprivation of political rights
Notes: Ill-treated in prison

Wang Guoqi
Date of birth: 1963
Occupation: Unemployed
Residence: Beijing
Name of organization: LPDC
Apprehended: June 1,1989, for printing leaflets protesting at 89 crackdown
Released: November 1, 1990
Apprehended: June 24, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democracy activities
Arrested: September 27, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for organizing and leading a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 11 years imprisonment and 3 years deprivation of political rights
Latest detention place known: Beijing Number Two Prison, Tongxian county
Notes: Denied family visits in June 1997 for failing to memorize prison regulations.

Lu Zhigang
Occupation:
Student
Residence: Shanghai
Name of organization: China Progressive Alliance
Apprehended: May 28, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democracy activities
Arrested: September 27, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for organizing and leading a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 5 years imprisonment and 2 years s deprivation of political rights

Wang Tiancheng
Date of birth:
1965
Occupation: Teacher
Residence: Beijing
Place of work: Law Department, Beijing University
Name of organization: LPDC
Apprehended: October 30, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democracy activities
Arrested: December 14, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for participation in a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 5 years imprisonment and 2 years deprivation of political rights

Chen Wei
Date of birth:
1970
Occupation: Unemployed
Residence: Suining City, Sichuan
Name of organization: LPDC
Apprehended: June 11, 1989, in connection with 89 pro-democracy movement
Released: January 1, 1991
Apprehended: May 29, 1993, for organizing and leading a counter revolutionary group
Arrested: September 27, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for organizing and leading a counter revolutionary group
Tried: July 4, 1994, Beijing Intermediate People s Court
Sentenced: December 16, 1994, 5 years imprisonment and 2 years deprivation of political rights

Zhang Chunzhu
Date of birth: 1953
Residence: Shandong
Name of organization: Free Labour Union of China
Apprehended: May 28, 1992, Beijing, in connection with pro-democracy activities
Arrested: September 27, 1992, Beijing
Indicted: July 29, 1993, for counter revolutionary propaganda and incitement
Tried: July 4, 1994, 5 years imprisonment and 2 years deprivation of political rights

Liu Nianchum
Date of birth:
1950
Occupation: Teacher
Arrested: May 1994
Assigned: Three years re-education through labour- recently extended
Imprisoned: Shuanghe State Farm
Organization: League For the Protection of the Rights of Working People
Notes: Recently believed to have been recently moved to a hospital in Beijing

Wang Ming
Date of Birth:
1960
Residence: Chongqing
Apprehended: November 17, 1996, writing and distributing a manifesto on freedom of speech
Assigned: December 1, 1996, 3 years re-education through labour
Place of detention: December 1, 1996, Sichuan Xishangping labour camp
Notes: Called for release of Wang Dang and Wei Jingsheng in manifesto of 16 November 1996

 

GUANGDONG

Zheng Shaoqiang
Date of birth:
1965
Occupation: Taxi driver
Residence: Zhuhai, Guangdong
Apprehended: January 15, 1996, for taking part in a taxi driver strike in Zhuhai
Accused: January 15, 1996, for seriously disturbing social security and road traffic
Assigned: January 15, 1996, 2 years of re-education through labour

Hu Yunquan
Occupaion:
Taxi driver
Residence: Zhuhai, Guangdong
Apprehended: January 15, 1996, for taking part in a taxi driver strike in Zhuhai
Accused: January 15, 1996, for seriously disturbing social security and road traffic
Assigned: January 15, 1996, 2 years of re-education through labour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese Sweatshops Labor for U.S. Retaliers, Report Says, Washington Post, March 19, 1998

Labor Activists Examine Low Salaries in China, Journal of Commerce, March 19, 1998

More Heat on Sweatshops, Newsday, March 19, 1998

 


 

Update: April 7, 1998

Letter from Members of Congress to President Bill Clinton, April 17, 1998

 


 

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